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Article Metrics

Switching treatments in COPD: implications for costs and treatment adherence

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
Title
Switching treatments in COPD: implications for costs and treatment adherence
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, December 2015
DOI 10.2147/copd.s79635
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fulvio Braido, Federico Lavorini, Francesco Blasi, Ilaria Baiardini, Giorgio Walter Canonica

Abstract

Inhaled therapy is key to the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). New drugs and inhalers have recently been launched or will soon become available, and the expiry of patent protection covering several currently used inhaled bronchodilators and corticosteroids will be accompanied by the development of bioequivalent, generic inhaled drugs. Consequently, a broader availability of branded and generic compounds will increase prescription opportunities. Given the time course of COPD, patients are likely to switch drugs and inhalers in daily practice. Switching from one device to another, if not accompanied by appropriate training for the patient, can be associated with poor clinical outcomes and increased use of health care resources. In fact, while it seems reasonable to prescribe generic inhaled drugs to reduce costs, inadequate use of inhaler devices, which is often associated with a poor patient-physician or patient-pharmacist relationship, is one of the most common reasons for failure to achieve COPD treatment outcomes. Further research is needed to quantify, as in asthma, the impact of inappropriate switching of inhalers in patients with COPD and show the outcomes related to the effect of using the same device for delivering inhaled medications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 76 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 16 21%
Researcher 15 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Student > Master 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 9 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 41%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 12 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 4%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 14 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 November 2017.
All research outputs
#1,148,400
of 12,184,158 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#148
of 1,458 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,733
of 316,422 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#10
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,184,158 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,458 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,422 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.