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Comparison of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in nulliparous women before and after introduction of the EPISCISSORS-60® at two hospitals in the United Kingdom

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Women's Health, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
Comparison of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in nulliparous women before and after introduction of the EPISCISSORS-60<sup>&reg;</sup> at two hospitals in the United Kingdom
Published in
International Journal of Women's Health, December 2015
DOI 10.2147/ijwh.s94680
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yves van Roon, Ciara Kirwin, Nadia Rahman, Latha Vinayakarao, Louise Melson, Nikki Kester, Sangeeta Pathak, Ashish Pradhan

Abstract

To assess whether the introduction of episiotomy scissors specially designed to achieve a cutting angle of 60°, EPISCISSORS-60(®), in two hospitals in the UK would result in a reduction in obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in nulliparous women. A structured training program for all doctors and midwives provided a theoretical framework around OASIS including risk factors and the role of episiotomies and a practical hands-on training element to use EPISCISSORS-60(®) correctly and to measure perineal body length and post-suturing angles. Data for perineal body length, post-suturing angles, user feedback, episiotomy use, and incidence of OASIS were collected through specifically designed forms and the general hospital data collection system. Data were available for 838 nulliparous vaginal deliveries. Mean perineal body length was 37 mm in spontaneous vaginal delivery group (standard deviation [SD] =8.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] =34-39) and 38 mm in the operative vaginal delivery group (SD=8, 95% CI=35-40). Post-suturing episiotomy angles were 53° (SD=6.5, 95% CI=50.7-55.8) in spontaneous vaginal deliveries and 52° (SD=9.6, 95% CI=49-54) in operative vaginal deliveries. EPISCISSORS-60(®) were rated as "good" to "very good" by 84% of users. There was a 47% increase in the number of episiotomies in nulliparous spontaneous vaginal deliveries at Poole (P=0.007) and a 16.5% increase in the number of episiotomies in nulliparous operative vaginal deliveries in Hinchingbrooke (P=0.003). There was an overall 11% increase in episiotomy numbers in nulliparous vaginal deliveries (P=0.08). There was a statistically significant OASIS reduction of 84% in nulliparous spontaneous vaginal deliveries in women who received an episiotomy (P=0.003). Initial results after introduction of EPISCISSORS-60(®) show that the majority of health care professionals achieve post-suturing episiotomy angles between 40° and 60°. The results also show a significant increase in the use of episiotomies in the delivery of nulliparous women. There has been a statistically significant reduction in OASIS in nulliparous spontaneous vaginal deliveries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Unknown 25 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 19%
Professor 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 7 27%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 54%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 15%
Linguistics 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2019.
All research outputs
#7,836,591
of 15,226,555 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Women's Health
#229
of 558 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,965
of 364,987 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Women's Health
#7
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,226,555 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 558 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 364,987 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.