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The interactive Physical and Cognitive Exercise System (iPACES™): effects of a 3-month in-home pilot clinical trial for mild cognitive impairment and caregivers

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, September 2018
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Title
The interactive Physical and Cognitive Exercise System (iPACES™): effects of a 3-month in-home pilot clinical trial for mild cognitive impairment and caregivers
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, September 2018
DOI 10.2147/cia.s160756
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cay Anderson-Hanley, Jessica Stark, Kathryn M Wall, Marisa VanBrakle, Makenzie Michel, Molly Maloney, Nicole Barcelos, Kristina Striegnitz, Brian Cohen, Arthur F Kramer

Abstract

Alzheimer's and related dementias are on the rise, and older adults and their families are seeking accessible and effective ways to stave off or ameliorate mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This pilot clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: 03069391) examined neuropsychological and neurobiological outcomes of interactive physical and mental exercise. Older adults (MCI and caregivers) were enrolled in a 3-month, in-home trial of a portable neuro-exergame (the interactive Physical and Cognitive Exercise System [iPACES™]), in which they pedaled and steered along a virtual bike path to complete a list of errands (Memory Lane™). Neuropsychological function and salivary biomarkers were measured at pre-, mid-, and posttrial. Ten older adults complied with the recommended use of iPACES (complete dose; ≥2×/wk, 67% of the 15 who also had pre- and postevaluation data). Statistical analyses compared change over time and also change among those with a complete dose vs inadequate dose. Correlations between change in neuropsychological and biomarker measures were also examined. Executive function and verbal memory increased after 3 months (p = 0.01; no significant change was found with an inadequate dose). Change in salivary biomarkers was moderately associated with increasing cognition (cortisol, r = 0.68; IGF-1, r = 0.37). Further research is needed, but these pilot data provide preliminary indications to suggest neuro-exergaming can impact cognitive function, perhaps via neurobiological mechanisms, and as such may provide an effective and practical way to promote healthy aging.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 151 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 151 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 20%
Student > Bachelor 27 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Researcher 8 5%
Other 25 17%
Unknown 32 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 26 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 13%
Computer Science 15 10%
Psychology 14 9%
Sports and Recreations 10 7%
Other 25 17%
Unknown 41 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2018.
All research outputs
#10,774,445
of 13,536,508 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#1,116
of 1,383 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,078
of 265,978 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#14
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,536,508 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,383 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,978 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.