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The effect of low-sodium dialysate on ambulatory blood pressure measurement parameters in patients undergoing hemodialysis

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, December 2015
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3 tweeters

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23 Mendeley
Title
The effect of low-sodium dialysate on ambulatory blood pressure measurement parameters in patients undergoing hemodialysis
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, December 2015
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s94889
Pubmed ID
Authors

serkan akdag, Huseyin Cakmak, Aydın Tosu, Muntecep Asker, Mehmet Yaman, Bilal Cegin, Naci Babat, Yasemin Soyoral, Ali Kemal Gor, Hasan Ali Gumrukcuoglu, Aytac Akyol

Abstract

End stage renal disease is related to increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disorder among hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-sodium dialysate on the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels detected by ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) in patients undergoing sustained HD treatment. The study included 46 patients who had creatinine clearance levels less than 10 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and had been on chronic HD treatment for at least 1 year. After the enrollment stage, the patients were allocated low-sodium dialysate or standard sodium dialysate for 6 months via computer-generated randomization. Twenty-four hour SBP, daytime SBP, nighttime SBP, and nighttime DBP were significantly decreased in the low-sodium dialysate group (P<0.05). No significant reduction was observed in both groups in terms of 24-hour DBP and daytime DBP (P=NS). No difference was found in the standard sodium dialysate group in terms of ABPM. Furthermore, IDWG was found to be significantly decreased in the low-sodium dialysate group after 6 months (P<0.001). The study revealed that low-sodium dialysate leads to a decrease in ABPM parameters including 24-hour SBP, daytime SBP, nighttime SBP, and nighttime DBP and it also reduces the number of antihypertensive drugs used and IDWG.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 26%
Student > Bachelor 5 22%
Researcher 5 22%
Other 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 65%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2015.
All research outputs
#7,528,740
of 12,485,238 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#537
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#163,986
of 344,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#29
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,485,238 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,534 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.