↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Risks on N-acetyltransferase 2 and bladder cancer: a meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in OncoTargets and therapy, December 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 807)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
8 Mendeley
Title
Risks on N-acetyltransferase 2 and bladder cancer: a meta-analysis
Published in
OncoTargets and therapy, December 2015
DOI 10.2147/ott.s82927
Pubmed ID
Authors

Youkong Li, Zhongheng Zhu, Xianjue Zhang, Xiaoming Xu, Wei Jiang, Jinshan Zhang

Abstract

It is known that bladder cancer disease is closely related to aromatic amine compounds, which could cause cancer by regulating of N-acetylation and N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2). The NAT2 slowed acetylation and would increase the risk of bladder cancer, with tobacco smoke being regarded as a risk factor for this increased risk. However, the relationship between NAT2 slow acetylation and bladder cancer is still debatable at present. This study aims to explore preliminarily correlation of NAT2 slow acetylation and the risk of bladder cancer. The articles were searched from PubMed, Cochran, McGrane English databases, CBM, CNKI, and other databases. The extraction of bladder cancer patients and a control group related with the NAT2 gene were detected by the state, and the referenced articles and publications were also used for data retrieval. Using a random effects model, the model assumes that the studies included in the analysis cases belong to the overall population in the study of random sampling, and considering the variables within and between studies. Data were analyzed using STATA Version 6.0 software, using the META module. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the literature study, 20 independent studies are included in this meta-analysis. The results showed that the individual differences of bladder cancer susceptibility might be part of the metabolism of carcinogens. Slow acetylation status of bladder cancer associated with the pooled odds ratio was 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.11-1.55). The status of NAT2 slow N-acetylation is associated with bladder cancer risks, and may increase the risk of bladder cancer.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 38%
Unspecified 2 25%
Student > Bachelor 2 25%
Lecturer 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 50%
Unspecified 3 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2015.
All research outputs
#909,080
of 6,787,729 outputs
Outputs from OncoTargets and therapy
#17
of 807 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,212
of 287,806 outputs
Outputs of similar age from OncoTargets and therapy
#2
of 215 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,787,729 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 807 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,806 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 215 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.