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Riding a roller coaster: narrative typologies of patients with neuroendocrine tumors

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, December 2015
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
Title
Riding a roller coaster: narrative typologies of patients with neuroendocrine tumors
Published in
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, December 2015
DOI 10.2147/jmdh.s90744
Pubmed ID
Authors

Solfrid Vatne, Alessia Miconi, Daniele De Nuzzo, Paola Pierontognetti

Abstract

Illness stories have attracted growing attention in health care research in the context of learning from looking at the world through the patients' eyes. No narrative studies were found about the patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs); a rare illness including tumors usually starting in hormone-producing cells. The aim of this article was to develop an extended understanding of these patients' experiences and struggles, as well as their solutions to a common problem. The data source was 21 letters written by the patients with NETs treated at an ambulatory treatment center at a large urban hospital in Italy. The letters were analyzed using the Arthur Frank's narrative method. We paid particular attention to statements of self-experience, which is crucial to get the character of the story. We identified four different typologies: "Not illness stories", "Living in imbalance", "Living a new life in balance", and "Living a normal life". The main characteristics of these four groups could be linked to Frank's typologies. However, the patients with this periodically changing disease were continuously in the process of attaining balance in life, and they might move between these various typologies. The NETs are incurable illnesses that challenged the peoples to attaining a new balance in life. We will highlight stories focusing on the patients' imbalance and chaos because they illuminated the patients' concrete suffering, which might provide clinicians with specific information about the patients' emotional, physical, and spiritual state. Through learning from the stories of the patients attaining new balance, it seems possible to move forward to acceptance and to develop a model for a new way of living. However, we are skeptical about labeling these stories as a model for clinical practice because they might contribute to individualistic and heroic prescriptions for life that are impossible for others to achieve.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 35%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Lecturer 1 5%
Librarian 1 5%
Other 4 20%
Unknown 5 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 15%
Psychology 2 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 5 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2015.
All research outputs
#4,798,762
of 6,790,336 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#135
of 199 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,480
of 288,037 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#8
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,790,336 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 199 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,037 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.