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Fractional flow reserve-guided percutaneous coronary intervention: where to after FAME 2?

Overview of attention for article published in Vascular Health and Risk Management, January 2015
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1 tweeter
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Citations

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20 Mendeley
Title
Fractional flow reserve-guided percutaneous coronary intervention: where to after FAME 2?
Published in
Vascular Health and Risk Management, January 2015
DOI 10.2147/vhrm.s68328
Pubmed ID
Authors

van de Hoef, Tim P, Meuwissen, Martijn, Piek, Jan J

Abstract

Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a well-validated clinical coronary physiological parameter derived from the measurement of coronary pressures and has drastically changed revascularization decision-making in clinical practice. Nonetheless, it is important to realize that FFR is a coronary pressure-derived estimate of coronary blood flow impairment. It is thereby not the same as direct measures of coronary flow impairment that determine the occurrence of signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This consideration is important, since the FAME 2 study documented a limited discriminatory power of FFR to identify stenoses that require revascularization to prevent adverse events. The physiological difference between FFR and direct measures of coronary flow impairment may well explain the findings in FAME 2. This review aims to address the physiological background of FFR, its ambiguities, and its consequences for the application of FFR in clinical practice, as well as to reinterpret the diagnostic and prognostic characteristics of FFR in the light of the recent FAME 2 trial outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 20%
Researcher 3 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 4 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 45%
Engineering 3 15%
Materials Science 1 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Unknown 6 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2015.
All research outputs
#5,043,640
of 6,790,336 outputs
Outputs from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#292
of 367 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#197,446
of 291,128 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#10
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,790,336 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 367 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,128 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.