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What influences patients’ acceptance of a blood pressure telemonitoring service in primary care? A qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in Patient preference and adherence, January 2016
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
Title
What influences patients’ acceptance of a blood pressure telemonitoring service in primary care? A qualitative study
Published in
Patient preference and adherence, January 2016
DOI 10.2147/ppa.s94687
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adina Abdullah, Su May Liew, Nik Sherina Hanafi, Chirk Jenn Ng, Pauline Siew Mei Lai, Yook Chin Chia, Loo Chu Kiong

Abstract

Telemonitoring of home blood pressure (BP) is found to have a positive effect on BP control. Delivering a BP telemonitoring service in primary care offers primary care physicians an innovative approach toward management of their patients with hypertension. However, little is known about patients' acceptance of such service in routine clinical care. This study aimed to explore patients' acceptance of a BP telemonitoring service delivered in primary care based on the technology acceptance model (TAM). A qualitative study design was used. Primary care patients with uncontrolled office BP who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were enrolled into a BP telemonitoring service offered between the period August 2012 and September 2012. This service was delivered at an urban primary care clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Twenty patients used the BP telemonitoring service. Of these, 17 patients consented to share their views and experiences through five in-depth interviews and two focus group discussions. An interview guide was developed based on the TAM. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used for analysis. Patients found the BP telemonitoring service easy to use but struggled with the perceived usefulness of doing so. They expressed confusion in making sense of the monitored home BP readings. They often thought about the implications of these readings to their hypertension management and overall health. Patients wanted more feedback from their doctors and suggested improvement to the BP telemonitoring functionalities to improve interactions. Patients cited being involved in research as the main reason for their intention to use the service. They felt that patients with limited experience with the internet and information technology, who worked out of town, or who had an outdoor hobby would not be able to benefit from such a service. Patients found BP telemonitoring service in primary care easy to use but needed help to interpret the meanings of monitored BP readings. Implementations of BP telemonitoring service must tackle these issues to maximize the patients' acceptance of a BP telemonitoring service.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 2%
Unknown 61 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 23%
Researcher 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 20 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 37%
Unspecified 8 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 6%
Engineering 4 6%
Other 15 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,416,306
of 7,187,728 outputs
Outputs from Patient preference and adherence
#344
of 706 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#153,388
of 320,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Patient preference and adherence
#17
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,187,728 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 706 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 320,334 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.