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Optimal breast cancer screening strategies for older women: current perspectives

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
35 Mendeley
Title
Optimal breast cancer screening strategies for older women: current perspectives
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
DOI 10.2147/cia.s65304
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dejana Braithwaite, Joshua Demb, Louise Henderson, Louise M Henderson

Abstract

Breast cancer is a major cause of cancer-related deaths among older women, aged 65 years or older. Screening mammography has been shown to be effective in reducing breast cancer mortality in women aged 50-74 years but not among those aged 75 years or older. Given the large heterogeneity in comorbidity status and life expectancy among older women, controversy remains over screening mammography in this population. Diminished life expectancy with aging may decrease the potential screening benefit and increase the risk of harms. In this review, we summarize the evidence on screening mammography utilization, performance, and outcomes and highlight evidence gaps. Optimizing the screening strategy will involve separating older women who will benefit from screening from those who will not benefit by using information on comorbidity status and life expectancy. This review has identified areas related to screening mammography in older women that warrant additional research, including the need to evaluate emerging screening technologies, such as tomosynthesis among older women and precision cancer screening. In the absence of randomized controlled trials, the benefits and harms of continued screening mammography in older women need to be estimated using both population-based cohort data and simulation models.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 20%
Unspecified 5 14%
Other 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Other 7 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 34%
Unspecified 5 14%
Social Sciences 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Engineering 3 9%
Other 8 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2016.
All research outputs
#3,850,731
of 8,154,593 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#491
of 977 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,405
of 331,894 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#21
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,154,593 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 50th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 977 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,894 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.