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New developments in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: considerations for the effective use of dalbavancin

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
Title
New developments in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: considerations for the effective use of dalbavancin
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, February 2016
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s71855
Pubmed ID
Authors

William J. Peppard, Janelle Juul, Caitlin Mullins, Angela Huang

Abstract

Dalbavancin, an intravenous glycopeptide, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in May 2014 for use in adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. The recommended dosing regimen for effective use of dalbavancin is 1,000 mg followed by a 500 mg dose after 1 week. Two multinational, identically designed, non-inferiority trials, DISCOVER 1 and 2, demonstrated similar early clinical success with dalbavancin compared to vancomycin with an option to switch to oral linezolid. In a recently published non-inferiority trial, a single-dose regimen of dalbavancin was compared to the traditional two-dose administration and was found to have a non-inferior clinical response. In the aforementioned trials, dalbavancin was well tolerated, with patients experiencing transient adverse events of mild to moderate severity. The prolonged half-life, excellent skin and soft tissue penetration, bactericidal activity against Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and convenient dosing make dalbavancin a reasonable option for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in adult patients who have tried and failed other therapies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 8 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 10 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2016.
All research outputs
#8,143,128
of 14,155,545 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#510
of 1,006 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,507
of 267,166 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#23
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,155,545 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,006 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,166 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.