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Relationship between frequent knee pain, obesity, and gait speed in older adults: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
Title
Relationship between frequent knee pain, obesity, and gait speed in older adults: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
DOI 10.2147/cia.s100546
Pubmed ID
Authors

Saad Bindawas

Abstract

Knee pain (KP) causes gait difficulties in older adults and is associated with slow gait speed (GS). Obesity has negative effects on health. GS is an important indicator of health, well-being, and mean life span in older adults and is a strong predictor of future disability and mortality. The relationship between frequent KP, obesity, and GS in older adults remains unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed at examining the relationship between baseline frequent KP and obesity status on GS over time. We hypothesized that frequent KP, obesity, or both would be associated with decreased GS over time. The data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative were used for this 6-year longitudinal cohort study. We studied 3,118 adults aged between 45 years and 79 years. We grouped the participants into the following four categories according to KP frequency and obesity status at baseline: 1) no KP and nonobese, 2) frequent KP and nonobese, 3) no KP and obese, and 4) frequent KP and obese. GS measurements were based on a 20 m walking test timed using a stopwatch; testing was performed at baseline and over a 6-year follow-up period. Walk pace (m/sec) was calculated as the average pace over two trials conducted at clinic visits. General linear mixed models were used to examine the relationships between frequent KP, obesity, and GS. After adjusting for all covariates, at baseline, all the nonobese group with frequent KP (β=-0.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.07 to -0.04), the obese group with no KP (β=-0.07, 95% CI: -0.1 to -0.04), and the obese group with frequent KP (β=-0.08, 95% CI: -0.1 to -0.05) exhibited decreased GS compared with the nonobese and no KP group. However, the associations between frequent KP, obesity, and GS over time were not statistically significant. Frequent KP alone, obesity alone, and the combination of frequent KP and obesity were all associated with decreased GS in older adults. These associations did not change in any of the groups longitudinally; as such, the slopes corresponding to the data remained unchanged.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 23%
Student > Bachelor 10 21%
Unspecified 6 13%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 11 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 36%
Unspecified 6 13%
Psychology 6 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Sports and Recreations 4 9%
Other 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2016.
All research outputs
#2,252,556
of 9,728,122 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#301
of 1,116 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,498
of 292,043 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#14
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,728,122 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,116 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,043 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.