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Investigating the health care delivery system in Japan and reviewing the local public hospital reform

Overview of attention for article published in Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#38 of 140)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
Title
Investigating the health care delivery system in Japan and reviewing the local public hospital reform
Published in
Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, March 2016
DOI 10.2147/rmhp.s93285
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xing Zhang, Tatsuo Oyama

Abstract

Japan's health care system is considered one of the best health care systems in the world. Hospitals are one of the most important health care resources in Japan. As such, we investigate Japanese hospitals from various viewpoints, including their roles, ownership, regional distribution, and characteristics with respect to the number of beds, staff, doctors, and financial performance. Applying a multivariate analysis and regression model techniques, we show the functional differences between urban populated prefectures and remote ones; the equality gap among all prefectures with respect to the distribution of the number of beds, staff, and doctors; and managerial differences between private and public hospitals. We also review and evaluate the local public hospital reform executed in 2007 from various financial aspects related to the expenditure and revenue structure by comparing public and private hospitals. We show that the 2007 reform contributed to improving the financial situation of local public hospitals. Strategic differences between public and private hospitals with respect to their management and strategy to improve their financial situation are also quantitatively analyzed in detail. Finally, the remaining problems and the future strategy to further improve the Japanese health care system are described.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 10 24%
Student > Bachelor 8 20%
Student > Master 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 13 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 5%
Other 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 September 2019.
All research outputs
#3,422,007
of 13,601,191 outputs
Outputs from Risk Management and Healthcare Policy
#38
of 140 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,535
of 263,810 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Risk Management and Healthcare Policy
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,601,191 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 140 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,810 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.