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Seasonality in acute liver injury? Findings in two health care claims databases

Overview of attention for article published in Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, March 2016
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
5 Mendeley
Title
Seasonality in acute liver injury? Findings in two health care claims databases
Published in
Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, March 2016
DOI 10.2147/dhps.s95399
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel B Weinstein, Martijn Schuemie, Patrick Ryan, Paul Stang, Weinstein, Rachel B, Schuemie, Martijn J, Ryan, Patrick B, Stang, Paul E

Abstract

Presumed seasonal use of acetaminophen-containing products for relief of cold/influenza ("flu") symptoms suggests that there might also be a corresponding seasonal pattern for acute liver injury (ALI), a known clinical consequence of acetaminophen overdose. The objective of this study was to determine whether there were any temporal patterns in hospitalizations for ALI that would correspond to assumed acetaminophen use in cold/flu season. In the period 2002-2010, monthly hospitalization rates for ALI using a variety of case definitions were calculated. Data sources included Truven MarketScan(®) Commercial Claims and Encounters (CCAE) and Medicare Supplemental and Coordination of Benefits (MDCR) databases. We performed a statistical test for seasonality of diagnoses using the periodic generalized linear model. To validate that the test can distinguish seasonal from nonseasonal patterns, we included two positive controls (ie, diagnoses of the common cold [acute nasopharyngitis] and influenza), believed to change with seasons, and two negative controls (female breast cancer and diabetes), believed to be insensitive to season. A seasonal pattern was observed in monthly rates for common cold and influenza diagnoses, but this pattern was not observed for monthly rates of ALI, with or without comorbidities (cirrhosis or hepatitis), breast cancer, or diabetes. The statistical test for seasonality was significant for positive controls (P<0.001 for each diagnosis in both databases) and nonsignificant for ALI and negative controls. No seasonal pattern was observed in the diagnosis of ALI. The positive and negative controls showed the expected patterns, strengthening the validity of the statistical and visual tests used for detecting seasonality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 60%
Student > Postgraduate 1 20%
Student > Master 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 60%
Mathematics 1 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2016.
All research outputs
#6,698,323
of 11,252,870 outputs
Outputs from Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety
#57
of 101 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,244
of 283,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety
#4
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,252,870 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 101 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,334 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.