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Sleep deprivation disturbed regional brain activity in healthy subjects: evidence from a functional magnetic resonance-imaging study

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
Title
Sleep deprivation disturbed regional brain activity in healthy subjects: evidence from a functional magnetic resonance-imaging study
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2016
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s99644
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yi Sun, Li Wang, Yin Chen, Ying Yao, Yu Pan

Abstract

The aim of this study was to use amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) to explore regional brain activities in healthy subjects after sleep deprivation (SD). A total of 16 healthy subjects (eight females, eight males) underwent the session twice: once was after normal sleep (NS), and the other was after SD. ALFF was used to assess local brain features. The mean ALFF-signal values of the different brain areas were evaluated to investigate relationships with clinical features and were analyzed with a receiver-operating characteristic curve. Compared with NS subjects, SD subjects showed a lower response-accuracy rate, longer response time, and higher lapse rate. Compared with NS subjects, SD subjects showed higher ALFF area in the right cuneus and lower ALFF area in the right lentiform nucleus, right claustrum, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left inferior parietal cortex. ALFF differences in regional brain areas showed high sensitivity and specificity. In the SD group, mean ALFF of the right claustrum showed a significant positive correlation with accuracy rate (r=0.687, P=0.013) and a negative correlation with lapse rate (r=-0.706, P=0.01). Mean ALFF of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex showed a significant positive correlation with response time (r=0.675, P=0.016). SD disturbed the regional brain activity of the default-mode network, its anticorrelated "task-positive" network, and the advanced cognitive function brain areas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 7 32%
Student > Master 4 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 18%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 36%
Psychology 4 18%
Neuroscience 4 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 9%
Sports and Recreations 1 5%
Other 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2016.
All research outputs
#6,651,501
of 12,517,383 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#824
of 2,120 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,404
of 265,474 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#50
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,383 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,120 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,474 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.