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The effects of fabric for sleepwear and bedding on sleep at ambient temperatures of 17°C and 22°C

Overview of attention for article published in Nature and science of sleep, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 385)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
Title
The effects of fabric for sleepwear and bedding on sleep at ambient temperatures of 17°C and 22°C
Published in
Nature and science of sleep, April 2016
DOI 10.2147/nss.s100271
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mirim Shin, Mark Halaki, Paul Swan, Angus Ireland, Chin Moi Chow

Abstract

The fibers used in clothing and bedding have different thermal properties. This study aimed to investigate the influences of textile fabrics on sleep under different ambient temperature (T a) conditions. Seventeen healthy young participants (ten males) underwent nine nights of polysomnography testing including an adaptation night. Participants were randomized to each of the three binary factors: sleepwear (cotton vs wool), bedding (polyester vs wool), and T a (17°C vs 22°C with relative humidity set at 60%). Skin temperature (T sk) and core temperature (T c) were monitored throughout the sleep period. Sleep onset latency (SOL) was significantly shortened when sleeping in wool with trends of increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency compared to cotton sleepwear. At 17°C, the proportion of sleep stages 1 (%N1) and 3 (%N3) and rapid eye movement sleep was higher, but %N2 was lower than at 22°C. Interaction effects (sleepwear × T a) showed a significantly shorter SOL for wool than cotton at 17°C but lower %N3 for wool than cotton at 22°C. A significantly lower %N2 but higher %N3 was observed for wool at 17°C than at 22°C. There was no bedding effect on sleep. Several temperature variables predicted the sleep findings in a stepwise multiple regression analysis and explained 67.8% of the variance in SOL and to a lesser degree the %N2 and %N3. These findings suggest that sleepwear played a contributory role to sleep outcomes and participants slept better at 17°C than at 22°C.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 21%
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 6 21%
Materials Science 4 14%
Design 2 7%
Psychology 2 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Other 6 21%
Unknown 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 103. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 July 2021.
All research outputs
#263,280
of 18,920,065 outputs
Outputs from Nature and science of sleep
#17
of 385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,367
of 273,086 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature and science of sleep
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,920,065 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 385 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,086 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them