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The effect of knowledge and expectations on adherence to and persistence with antidepressants

Overview of attention for article published in Patient preference and adherence, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
Title
The effect of knowledge and expectations on adherence to and persistence with antidepressants
Published in
Patient preference and adherence, May 2016
DOI 10.2147/ppa.s99803
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sophie Woodward, Bonnie Bereznicki, Juanita Westbury, Luke Bereznicki

Abstract

Adherence to and persistence with antidepressants are often suboptimal. However, little is known about how patient knowledge and outcome expectations may influence antidepressant adherence and persistence. Individuals who had been prescribed their first antidepressant to treat depression in the preceding 6 months were recruited to an online survey via Facebook. Knowledge, education received, and initial outcome expectations were analyzed for associations with persistence and adherence. Two hundred and twenty surveys were analyzed. A total of 117 participants had taken their antidepressant for at least 3 months; another 25 had never started or stopped after <3 months without consulting their doctor. Differences in expectations and various educational messages among persistent and nonpersistent participants were identified. Having received the instruction "don't stop it without checking with your doctor" was a significant independent predictor of persistence (odds ratio [OR] =5.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.4-24.5). At the time of the survey, 82.7% of participants were taking an antidepressant and 77.9% were adherent. Significant independent predictors of adherence were a greater age (OR =1.1, 95% CI =1.0-1.2), knowledge (OR =1.6, 95% CI =1.1-2.3), being informed of common side effects (OR =5.5, 95% CI =1.1-29.0), and having discussed ways to solve problems (OR =3.9, 95% CI =1.1-14.5). Improving outcome expectations and particular educational messages may increase adherence and persistence. Greater knowledge may enhance adherence. Further investigation is warranted to determine whether a focus on these simple educational messages will improve outcomes in patients who commence an antidepressant.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Iceland 1 4%
United States 1 4%
Unknown 26 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 18%
Researcher 5 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 14%
Other 2 7%
Other 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 32%
Unspecified 9 32%
Psychology 4 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2016.
All research outputs
#4,094,520
of 7,820,779 outputs
Outputs from Patient preference and adherence
#437
of 761 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,346
of 267,654 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Patient preference and adherence
#48
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,820,779 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 761 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,654 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.