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Ocular manifestations of Sturge–Weber syndrome: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Ophthalmology, May 2016
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54 Mendeley
Title
Ocular manifestations of Sturge–Weber syndrome: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management
Published in
Clinical Ophthalmology, May 2016
DOI 10.2147/opth.s101963
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alessandro Lambiase, Flavio Mantelli, Alice Bruscolini, Maurizio La Cava, Solmaz Abdolrahimzadeh

Abstract

Sturge-Weber syndrome has been included in the group of phakomatoses that is characterized by hamartomas involving the brain, skin, and eyes. The characteristic facial port-wine stain, involving the first branch of the trigeminal nerve and the embryonic vasculature distribution in this area, leads to several ocular complications of the anterior segment and can involve the eyelids and conjunctiva. The posterior segment of the eyes is also affected with diffuse choroidal hemangiomas. However, the most frequent ocular comorbidity is glaucoma with a prevalence rate ranging from 30%-70%. Glaucoma is related to anterior chamber malformations, high episcleral venous pressure (EVP), and changes in ocular hemodynamics. Glaucoma can be diagnosed at birth, but the disease can also develop during childhood and in adults. The management of glaucoma in Sturge-Weber syndrome patients is particularly challenging because of early onset, frequently associated severe visual field impairment at the time of diagnosis, and unresponsiveness to standard treatment. Several surgical approaches have been proposed, but long-term prognosis for both intraocular pressure control and visual function remains unsatisfactory in these patients. Choroidal hemangiomas may also lead to visual impairment thorough exudative retinal detachment and macular edema. Treatment of exudative hemangioma complications is aimed at destructing the tumor or decreasing tumor leakage.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 10 19%
Student > Postgraduate 9 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Researcher 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 56%
Neuroscience 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Unknown 16 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2016.
All research outputs
#9,995,752
of 12,488,808 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Ophthalmology
#1,036
of 1,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,177
of 265,765 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Ophthalmology
#55
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,488,808 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,597 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,765 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.