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Morbid obese adults increased their sense of coherence 1 year after a patient education course: a longitudinal study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 219)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
Title
Morbid obese adults increased their sense of coherence 1 year after a patient education course: a longitudinal study
Published in
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, March 2015
DOI 10.2147/jmdh.s77763
Pubmed ID
Authors

May Solveig Fagermoen, Glenys Hamilton, Anners Lerdal

Abstract

Personal factors are key elements to understand peoples' health behavior. Studies of such factors are important to develop targeted interventions to improve health. The main purpose of this study is to explore sense of coherence (SOC) in a sample of persons with morbid obesity before and after attending a patient education course and to explore the association between SOC and sociodemographic and other personal factors. In this longitudinal purposely sampled study, the participants completed questionnaires on the first day of the course and 12 months after course completion. Sixty-eight participants had valid scores on the selected variables at follow-up: SOC, self-esteem, and self-efficacy. Relationships were assessed with correlation analyses and paired and independent samples t-tests and predictors with linear regression analyses. From baseline to follow-up, the total SOC score and the subdimension scores comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness all increased significantly. At both time points, the SOC scores were low compared to the general population but similar to scores in other chronically ill. At baseline, a multivariate analysis showed that older age, having paid work, and higher self-esteem were directly related to higher total SOC score after controlling for other sociodemographic factors and the participants' level of self-efficacy. Multivariate analyses of the relationship between baseline predictors of SOC at 12-month follow-up, controlling for baseline SOC scores or sociodemographic or personal factors, revealed that none of these variables independently predicted SOC scores at follow-up. The total SOC score and its subdimensions increased significantly at follow-up. SOC may be a useful outcome measure for lifestyle interventions in people with morbid obesity and possibly other health care problems. Subdimension scores may give an indication of what is poorly developed and needs strengthening. This might guide choices for targeted cognitive and psychosocial interventions. Further studies are needed to explore this issue with larger samples.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 14%
Professor 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 23%
Psychology 3 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 4 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 May 2016.
All research outputs
#1,065,528
of 7,715,105 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#26
of 219 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,904
of 269,130 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#3
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,715,105 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 219 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,130 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.