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Nutrigenomic effects of edible bird’s nest on insulin signaling in ovariectomized rats

Overview of attention for article published in Drug Design, Development and Therapy, August 2015
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Title
Nutrigenomic effects of edible bird’s nest on insulin signaling in ovariectomized rats
Published in
Drug Design, Development and Therapy, August 2015
DOI 10.2147/dddt.s80743
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhiping Hou, Mustapha Umar Imam, Maznah Ismail, Rozi Mahmud, Aini Ideris, Der Jiun Ooi

Abstract

Estrogen deficiency alters quality of life during menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has been used to improve quality of life and prevent complications, but side effects limit its use. In this study, we evaluated the use of edible bird's nest (EBN) for prevention of cardiometabolic problems in rats with ovariectomy-induced menopause. Ovariectomized female rats were fed for 12 weeks with normal rat chow, EBN, or estrogen and compared with normal non-ovariectomized rats. Metabolic indices (insulin, estrogen, superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde, oral glucose tolerance test, and lipid profile) were measured at the end of the experiment from serum and liver tissue homogenate, and transcriptional levels of hepatic insulin signaling genes were measured. The results showed that ovariectomy worsened metabolic indices and disrupted the normal transcriptional pattern of hepatic insulin signaling genes. EBN improved the metabolic indices and also produced transcriptional changes in hepatic insulin signaling genes that tended toward enhanced insulin sensitivity, and glucose and lipid homeostasis, even better than estrogen. The data suggest that EBN could meliorate estrogen deficiency-associated increase in risk of cardiometabolic disease in rats, and may in fact be useful as a functional food for the prevention of such a problem in humans. The clinical validity of these findings is worth studying further.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 37 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 26%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Unspecified 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 9 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,800,624
of 7,851,688 outputs
Outputs from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#689
of 1,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,365
of 269,236 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#40
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,851,688 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,008 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,236 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.