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Nondrug-related aspect of treating Ekbom disease, formerly known as restless legs syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, May 2011
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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Readers on

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62 Mendeley
Title
Nondrug-related aspect of treating Ekbom disease, formerly known as restless legs syndrome
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, May 2011
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s19177
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mitchell

Abstract

Ekbom disease (EKD), formerly known as restless legs syndrome (RLS) has affected and bothered many people over the centuries. It is one of the most prevalent neurological disorders in Europe and North-America, affecting about 10% of the population. The main characteristics are the strong urge to move, accompanied or caused by uncomfortable, sometimes even distressing, paresthesia of the legs, described as a "creeping, tugging, pulling" feeling. The symptoms often become worse as the day progresses, leading to sleep disturbances or sleep deprivation, which leads to decreased alertness and daytime functions. Numerous studies have been conducted assessing the efficacy of dopaminergic drugs, opioids, and other pharmacologic agents in alleviating EKD symptoms. However, there is also a growing body of evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic treatments including life style changes, physical activity programs, pneumatic compression, massage, near-infrared light therapy, and complementary therapies. The working mechanisms behind these alternatives are diverse. Some increase blood flow to the legs, therefore reducing tissue hypoxia; some introduce an afferent counter stimulus to the cortex and with that "close the gate" for aberrant nerve stimulations; some increase dopamine and nitric oxide and therefore augment bio-available neurotransmitters; and some generate endorphins producing an analgesic effect. The advantages of these treatments compared with pharmacologic agents include less or no side effects, no danger of augmentation, and less cost.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 60 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Master 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 14 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 39%
Psychology 6 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 15 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2017.
All research outputs
#6,834,011
of 8,968,121 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,403
of 1,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,408
of 96,015 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#24
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,968,121 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,715 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 96,015 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.