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Abiraterone acetate: oral androgen biosynthesis inhibitor for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Drug Design, Development and Therapy, January 2012
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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59 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
91 Mendeley
Title
Abiraterone acetate: oral androgen biosynthesis inhibitor for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer
Published in
Drug Design, Development and Therapy, January 2012
DOI 10.2147/dddt.s15850
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yasser Rehman, Yasser Rehman

Abstract

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the US and Europe. The treatment of advanced-stage prostate cancer has been androgen deprivation. Medical castration leads to decreased production of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone by the testes, but adrenal glands and even prostate cancer tissue continue to produce androgens, which eventually leads to continued prostate cancer growth despite castrate level of androgens. This stage is known as castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which continues to be a challenge to treat. Addition of androgen antagonists to hormonal deprivation has been successful in lowering the prostate-specific antigen levels further, but has not actually translated into life-prolonging options. The results of several contemporary studies have continued to demonstrate activation of the androgen receptor as being the key factor in the continued growth of prostate cancer. Blockade of androgen production by nongonadal sources has led to clinical benefit in this setting. One such agent is abiraterone acetate, which significantly reduces androgen production by blocking the enzyme, cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP17). This has provided physicians with another treatment option for patients with CRPC. The landscape for prostate cancer treatment has changed with the approval of cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T and abiraterone. Here we provide an overview of abiraterone acetate, its mechanism of action, and its potential place for therapy in CRPC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Israel 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 87 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 21%
Student > Master 19 21%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Other 7 8%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 8 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 10 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 10%
Chemistry 7 8%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 12 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2012.
All research outputs
#6,203,224
of 8,163,518 outputs
Outputs from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#554
of 1,036 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,184
of 95,063 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#7
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,163,518 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,036 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 95,063 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.