↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Human immunodeficiency virus prevalence in an unbooked obstetric population in the Niger Delta

Overview of attention for article published in HIV/AIDS (Auckland, N.Z.), July 2012
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
Title
Human immunodeficiency virus prevalence in an unbooked obstetric population in the Niger Delta
Published in
HIV/AIDS (Auckland, N.Z.), July 2012
DOI 10.2147/hiv.s9630
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chris I Akani, Erhabor Osaro, Dennis O Allagoa

Abstract

Despite recent advances in the prevention of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection from mother to child during pregnancy, infants continue to be born and infected with HIV, particularly in Africa. This study was undertaken to determine the seroprevalence of HIV infection among unbooked pregnant women in the Niger Delta of Nigeria. One hundred and eighteen consecutively recruited unbooked subjects presenting to the isolation ward at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital were screened for HIV. Among the 118 subjects studied, 30 (25.4%) were positive for HIV. HIV-1 was the predominant viral strain. Gestational age of subjects at presentation was 28-40 weeks and mean age was 35.04 ± 8.06 years. The majority of subjects were primigravidas 66 (55.9%), while 52 (44.1%) were multigravidas. The prevalence of HIV was significantly higher among unbooked pregnant women with less formal education: 14 (11.9%) compared with 9 (7.6%), 5 (4.2%), and 2 (1.7%) for those with primary, secondary, and tertiary education, respectively (P = 0.01). Among the occupational groups, the prevalence of HIV was significantly higher among traders 14 (11.9%) than in career women 5 (4.2%, P = 0.04). Multigravid women were more susceptible to HIV infection 17 (14.4%) than primigravid women. Perinatal mortality and emergency cesarean section was high among unbooked pregnant women. The prevalence of HIV observed amongst unbooked antenatal subjects in this study is significantly higher than those of booked patients in previous studies. These findings are very pertinent to health care delivery, because this pool of unbooked patients may not be benefiting from the Prevention of Maternal to Child Transmission program, thus increasing the pediatric HIV burden in our environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 40%
Student > Master 2 20%
Professor 1 10%
Student > Postgraduate 1 10%
Other 1 10%
Other 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 40%
Social Sciences 3 30%
Unspecified 2 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2011.
All research outputs
#2,746,782
of 3,619,418 outputs
Outputs from HIV/AIDS (Auckland, N.Z.)
#52
of 67 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,115
of 72,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age from HIV/AIDS (Auckland, N.Z.)
#10
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,619,418 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 67 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 72,087 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.