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Ranibizumab in the treatment of patients with visual impairment due to diabetic macular edema

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Ophthalmology, September 2011
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
Ranibizumab in the treatment of patients with visual impairment due to diabetic macular edema
Published in
Clinical Ophthalmology, September 2011
DOI 10.2147/opth.s17423
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesco Bandello, De Benedetto, Knutsson, maurizio parodi, Cascavilla, Pierluigi Iacono

Abstract

Diabetic macular edema is the major cause of visual acuity impairment in diabetic patients. The exact etiopathogenesis is unknown and, currently, grid/focal retinal laser photocoagulation represents the recommended treatment. It has been demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of diabetic macular edema by mediating vascular permeability and accumulation of intracellular and extracellular fluid, and thereby represents an appealing candidate as a therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. The advent of intravitreal anti-VEGF drugs has opened up a new era for the management of diabetic macular edema. At present, three anti-VEGF substances are available for routine clinical use, ie, pegaptanib, ranibizumab, and bevacizumab. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence supporting the use of ranibizumab in clinical practice. Most of the studies analyzed in this review are prospective, controlled clinical trials that have focused on documenting the therapeutic effect of ranibizumab and its safety, providing encouraging results.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 27%
Other 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 59%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 5%
Mathematics 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2011.
All research outputs
#11,106,047
of 12,488,808 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Ophthalmology
#1,384
of 1,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,206
of 119,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Ophthalmology
#27
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,488,808 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,597 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 119,446 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.