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Human normal immunoglobulin in the treatment of primary immunodeficiency diseases

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, April 2012
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
Human normal immunoglobulin in the treatment of primary immunodeficiency diseases
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, April 2012
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s22599
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip Wood

Abstract

The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are a rare group of disorders that can present at any age, and for which delay in diagnosis remains common. Replacement therapy with immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiencies increases life expectancy and reduces the frequency and severity of infection. Higher doses of immunoglobulin are associated with reduced frequency of infection. Late diagnosis and delayed institution of immunoglobulin replacement therapy results in increased morbidity with a wide variety of organ-specific complications and increased mortality. Risks of immunoglobulin therapy are minimized by modern manufacturing processes, although patients can experience both immediate and delayed adverse reactions, and concerns remain over the transmission of prions in plasma. Immunoglobulin therapy leads to improvements in overall quality of life, and many of the improvements relate to reduced infection rates and fear of future infections, strongly suggesting that the immunoglobulin therapy itself is the major factor in this improvement. There are limited data on the economic benefits of immunoglobulin therapy, with the fluctuating costs of immunoglobulins making comparison between different studies difficult. However, estimates suggest that early intervention with immunoglobulin replacement compares favorably with prolonged therapy for other more common chronic diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 21%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Other 3 9%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 April 2012.
All research outputs
#9,589,914
of 12,485,238 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#731
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,597
of 119,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#9
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,485,238 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 119,421 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.