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Treating nausea and vomiting in palliative care: a review

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, September 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
95 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
301 Mendeley
Title
Treating nausea and vomiting in palliative care: a review
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, September 2011
DOI 10.2147/cia.s13109
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul Glare, Jeanna Miller, Nikolova, Tickoo

Abstract

Nausea and vomiting are portrayed in the specialist palliative care literature as common and distressing symptoms affecting the majority of patients with advanced cancer and other life-limiting illnesses. However, recent surveys indicate that these symptoms may be less common and bothersome than has previously been reported. The standard palliative care approach to the assessment and treatment of nausea and vomiting is based on determining the cause and then relating this back to the "emetic pathway" before prescribing drugs such as dopamine antagonists, antihistamines, and anticholinergic agents which block neurotransmitters at different sites along the pathway. However, the evidence base for the effectiveness of this approach is meager, and may be in part because relevance of the neuropharmacology of the emetic pathway to palliative care patients is limited. Many palliative care patients are over the age of 65 years, making these agents difficult to use. Greater awareness of drug interactions and QT(c) prolongation are emerging concerns for all age groups. The selective serotonin receptor antagonists are the safest antiemetics, but are not used first-line in many countries because there is very little scientific rationale or clinical evidence to support their use outside the licensed indications. Cannabinoids may have an increasing role. Advances in interventional gastroenterology are increasing the options for nonpharmacological management. Despite these emerging issues, the approach to nausea and vomiting developed within palliative medicine over the past 40 years remains relevant. It advocates careful clinical evaluation of the symptom and the person suffering it, and an understanding of the clinical pharmacology of medicines that are available for palliating them.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 301 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 290 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 56 19%
Other 40 13%
Student > Bachelor 30 10%
Researcher 29 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 26 9%
Other 80 27%
Unknown 40 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 145 48%
Nursing and Health Professions 30 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 24 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 4%
Psychology 9 3%
Other 33 11%
Unknown 47 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 April 2021.
All research outputs
#769,156
of 17,469,628 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#75
of 1,605 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,833
of 134,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#5
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,469,628 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,605 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 134,192 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.