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The economic impact of enoxaparin versus unfractionated heparin for prevention of venous thromboembolism in acute ischemic stroke patients

Overview of attention for article published in ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR, May 2012
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1 tweeter

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25 Mendeley
Title
The economic impact of enoxaparin versus unfractionated heparin for prevention of venous thromboembolism in acute ischemic stroke patients
Published in
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR, May 2012
DOI 10.2147/ceor.s30857
Pubmed ID
Authors

Graham Pineo, Lin, Annemans

Abstract

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication after acute ischemic stroke that can be prevented by the use of anticoagulants. Current guidelines from the American College of Chest Physicians recommend that patients with acute ischemic stroke and restricted mobility receive prophylactic low-dose unfractionated heparin or a low-molecular-weight heparin. Results from clinical studies, most recently from PREVAIL (PREvention of Venous Thromboembolism After Acute Ischemic Stroke with LMWH and unfractionated heparin), suggest that the low-molecular-weight heparin, enoxaparin, is preferable to unfractionated heparin for VTE prophylaxis in patients with acute ischemic stroke and restricted mobility. This is due to a better clinical benefit-to-risk ratio, with the added convenience of once-daily administration. In line with findings from modeling studies and real-world data in acutely ill medical patients, recent economic data indicate that the higher drug cost of enoxaparin is offset by the reduction in clinical events as compared with the use of unfractionated heparin for the prevention of VTE after acute ischemic stroke, particularly in patients with severe stroke. With national performance measures highlighting the need for hospitals to examine their VTE practices, the relative costs of different regimens are of particular importance to health care decision-makers. The data reviewed here suggest that preferential use of enoxaparin over unfractionated heparin for the prevention of VTE after acute ischemic stroke may lead to reduced VTE rates and concomitant cost savings in clinical practice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 20%
Student > Postgraduate 4 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 6 24%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 60%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 8%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2012.
All research outputs
#3,533,504
of 4,506,935 outputs
Outputs from ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR
#139
of 156 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58,516
of 75,175 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR
#10
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,506,935 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 156 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.