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Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, July 2016
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3 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
Title
Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, July 2016
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s107074
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giovanni Messina, Emanuela Viggiano, Vincenzo Monda, Antonietta Messina, Fiorenzo Moscatelli, Anna Valenzano, Domenico Tafuri, Giuseppe Cibelli, Bruno De Luca, Marcellino Monda

Abstract

Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD), which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs) 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 16%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Professor 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 4 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 24%
Neuroscience 4 16%
Psychology 3 12%
Chemistry 2 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 8 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2016.
All research outputs
#8,378,781
of 14,533,317 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,150
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,684
of 259,420 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#66
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,533,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,420 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.