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Decreasing the critical value of hemoglobin required for physician notification reduces the rate of blood transfusions

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of General Medicine, July 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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10 Mendeley
Title
Decreasing the critical value of hemoglobin required for physician notification reduces the rate of blood transfusions
Published in
International Journal of General Medicine, July 2016
DOI 10.2147/ijgm.s96248
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric A Larson, Paul A Thompson, Zachary K Anderson, Keith A Anderson, Roxana A Lupu, Vicki Tigner, Wendell W Hoffman

Abstract

Red blood cell transfusions have been cited as one of the most overused therapeutic interventions in the USA. Excessively aggressive transfusion practices may be driven by mandatory physician notification of critical hemoglobin values that do not generally require transfusion. We examined the effect of decreasing the critical value of hemoglobin from 8 to 7 g/dL at our institution. Along with this change, mandatory provider notification for readings between 7 and 8 g/dL was rescinded. Transfusion rates were compared retrospectively during paired 5-month periods for patients presenting in three key hemoglobin ranges (6.00-6.99, 7.00-7.99, and 8.00-8.99 g/dL). A change in transfusion practices was hypothesized in the 7-8 g/dL range, which was no longer labeled critical and for which mandated physician calls were rescinded. Transfusion rates showed a statistically significant 8% decrease (P≤0.0001) during the 5-month period post change in our transfusion practices. This decrease in the 7.00-7.99 g/dL range was significantly greater than the 2% decrease observed in either the 6-6.99 g/dL (P=0.0017) or 8-8.99 g/dL (P≤0.0001) range. Cost savings of up to $700,000/year were extrapolated from our results showing 491 fewer units of red blood cells transfused during the 5-month post change. These cost savings do not take into account the additional impact of complications associated with blood transfusions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 20%
Student > Postgraduate 2 20%
Professor 1 10%
Student > Master 1 10%
Other 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 20%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 10%
Engineering 1 10%
Unknown 3 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2016.
All research outputs
#10,362,421
of 16,233,200 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of General Medicine
#268
of 494 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,957
of 267,157 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of General Medicine
#6
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,233,200 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 494 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,157 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.