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Predicting Gleason score using the initial serum total prostate-specific antigen in Black men with symptomatic prostate adenocarcinoma in Nigeria

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
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33 Mendeley
Title
Predicting Gleason score using the initial serum total prostate-specific antigen in Black men with symptomatic prostate adenocarcinoma in Nigeria
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
DOI 10.2147/cia.s98232
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ikenna Nnabugwu, Emeka Udeh, Fredrick Ugwumba, Francis Ozoemena

Abstract

Men of Black African descent are known to have the highest incidence of prostate cancer. The disease is also more aggressive in this group possibly due to biologically more aggressive tumor or late presentation. Currently, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay plays a significant role in making the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, the obtained value of serum PSA may not directly relate with the Gleason score (GS), a measure of tumor aggression in prostate cancer. This study explores the relationship between serum total PSA at presentation (iPSA) and GS. The iPSA of patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer was compared with the obtained GS of the prostate biopsy specimens. The age of the patients at presentation and the prostate volumes were also analyzed with respect to the iPSA and GS. The data were analyzed retrospectively using IBM SPSS Version 20. Pearson correlation was used for numeric variables, whereas Fisher's exact test was used for categorical variables. Significance was set at P≤0.05. There were 205 patients from January 2010 to November 2013 who satisfied the inclusion criteria. iPSA as well as age at presentation and prostate volume were not found to significantly correlate with the primary Gleason grade, the secondary Gleason grade, or the GS. However, the presence of distant metastasis was identified to significantly correlate positively with GS. GS may not be confidently predicted by the iPSA. Higher iPSA does not correlate with higher GS and vice versa.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 7 21%
Student > Bachelor 6 18%
Lecturer 4 12%
Researcher 4 12%
Other 3 9%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 61%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 5 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2016.
All research outputs
#5,854,390
of 8,088,896 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#655
of 971 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,659
of 257,791 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#36
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,088,896 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 971 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,791 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.