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Dove Medical Press

Treatment acceptance and adherence in HIV disease: patient identity and the perceived impact of physician–patient communication

Overview of attention for article published in Patient preference and adherence, December 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
Title
Treatment acceptance and adherence in HIV disease: patient identity and the perceived impact of physician–patient communication
Published in
Patient preference and adherence, December 2012
DOI 10.2147/ppa.s36912
Pubmed ID
Authors

M Barton Laws, Gary S Rose, Tanya Bezreh, Mary Catherine Beach, Tatiana Taubin, Laura Kogelman, Marcia Gethers, Ira B Wilson

Abstract

Studies have found that physician-patient relationships and communication quality are related to medication adherence and outcomes in HIV care. Few qualitative studies exist of how people living with HIV experience clinical communication about their self-care behavior. Eight focus groups with people living with HIV in two US cities were conducted. Participants responded to a detailed discussion guide and to reenactments of actual physician-patient dialogue about antiretroviral adherence. The 82 participants were diverse in age, sex, and ethnicity. Most had been living with HIV for many years and had stable relationships with providers. They appreciated providers who knew and cared about their personal lives, who were clear and direct about instructions, and who were accessible. Most had struggled to overcome addiction, emotional turmoil, and/or denial before gaining control over their lives and becoming adherent to medications. They made little or no causal attribution for their transformation to any outside agency, including their providers. They generally saw medication adherence as a function of autonomous motivation. Successful coping with HIV with its prevalent behavioral comorbidities, stigma, and other challenges requires a transformation of identity and internalization of motivation to maintain health. Effective methods for clinicians to support such development are needed.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 70 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 18%
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 13 18%
Unknown 14 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 24%
Psychology 16 23%
Social Sciences 10 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 11%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 14 20%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2013.
All research outputs
#3,381,871
of 25,374,647 outputs
Outputs from Patient preference and adherence
#194
of 1,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,583
of 285,748 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Patient preference and adherence
#1
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,374,647 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,757 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,748 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.