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The periodicity of sleep duration – an infradian rhythm in spontaneous living

Overview of attention for article published in Nature and science of sleep, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
Title
The periodicity of sleep duration – an infradian rhythm in spontaneous living
Published in
Nature and science of sleep, January 2013
DOI 10.2147/nss.s38116
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shi Ngar Wong, Halaki, Chow, Wong SN, Halaki M, Chow CM

Abstract

The sleep-wake cycle is a process not only dictated by homeostatic and circadian factors but also by social and environmental influences. Thus, the total sleep time partly reflects sleep need, which is integral to the dynamics of sleep loss recovery. This study explored the nature of the observed oscillations in total sleep time in healthy adults under spontaneous living conditions. Actigraph-measured sleep data for 13 healthy young male adults were collected over 14 consecutive days and analyzed for habitual sleep duration. The total sleep time periodicity was modeled using the cosinor method for each individual across the 14 days. The findings confirm the existence of periodicity in habitual sleep duration as there were clear periodic patterns in the majority of the participants. Although exclusive to each individual, the observed oscillations may be a resultant response of homeostatic sleep need, circadian timing, and/or social and environmental influences. These findings instigate further indepth studies into the periodicity of sleep duration in healthy individuals to provide a better understanding of sleep need in short versus long sleepers, in predicting work performance, and reducing sleepiness-related accidents following shift work, and how this periodicity may impact sleep treatment outcome in clinical populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 2%
France 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Croatia 1 2%
Unknown 41 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 20%
Student > Master 9 20%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 20%
Psychology 8 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Engineering 3 7%
Neuroscience 3 7%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2013.
All research outputs
#483,775
of 4,507,211 outputs
Outputs from Nature and science of sleep
#6
of 56 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,042
of 284,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature and science of sleep
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,211 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 56 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,831 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them