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Safety and efficacy of levetiracetam for the treatment of partial onset seizures in children from one month of age

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2013
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46 Mendeley
Title
Safety and efficacy of levetiracetam for the treatment of partial onset seizures in children from one month of age
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2013
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s30224
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine Chu-Shore, Cormier

Abstract

Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder in the pediatric population, affecting up to one percent of children, and for which the mainstay of treatment is anticonvulsant medication. Despite the frequent use of anticonvulsant drugs, remarkably little is known about the safety and efficacy of most of these medications in the pediatric epilepsy population. Of 34 anticonvulsants currently approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), only 13 have been approved for use in children. Although infants and young children are disproportionately affected by epilepsy, there are currently only three anticonvulsant medications that have been specifically evaluated and approved for use in children younger than 2 years of age. In 2012, the FDA approved levetiracetam as an adjunctive treatment for partial onset seizures in infants and children from one month of age. Here we review the available data on levetiracetam in the pediatric epilepsy population. We first discuss the pharmacological profile of levetiracetam, including its mechanism of action, formulations and dosing, and pharmacokinetics in children. We then review the available efficacy, safety, and tolerability data in children from one month of age with partial onset seizures. We conclude that the current data leading to the approval of levetiracetam for use in infants and children with partial onset seizures is encouraging, although more work needs to be done before definitive conclusions can be drawn about the efficacy of levetiracetam across different pediatric age groups.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Other 12 26%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 30%
Psychology 13 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2013.
All research outputs
#2,900,093
of 3,629,910 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#572
of 677 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,409
of 85,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#30
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,629,910 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 677 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 85,598 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.