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Skin matters! The role of keratinocytes in nociception: a rational argument for the development of topical analgesics

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pain Research, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
Skin matters! The role of keratinocytes in nociception: a rational argument for the development of topical analgesics
Published in
Journal of Pain Research, December 2016
DOI 10.2147/jpr.s122765
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jan M Keppel Hesselink, David J Kopsky, Arun K Bhaskar

Abstract

Treatment of neuropathic pain using topical formulations is still in its infancy. Only few topical analgesic formulations have become available for clinical use, and among these, analgesic creams are still rare. This is unfortunate because analgesic creams offer a number of advantages over patches, such as convenience, ease of adapting the frequency of application, and dose, and "rubbing cream where it hurts" involves the patient much more in the therapeutic process compared to patches and other localized treatment modalities. Although the literature supporting the efficacy and safety of analgesic creams (mostly compounded) is growing since the last decade, most pain physicians have not yet noticed and appreciated the therapeutic potential and clinical value of these creams. This is most probably due to a prejudice that topical application should need to act transdermally, more or less as a slow-release formulation, such as in patches delivering opioids. We will discuss this prejudice and show that there are multiple important targets in the skin to be reached by topical analgesic or anti-inflammatory compounds, and that the keratinocyte is one of those targets. By specifically targeting the keratinocyte, analgesia seems possible, effective, and safe, and thus topical analgesic creams may hold promise as a novel treatment modality for neuropathic pain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 18%
Neuroscience 6 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 7 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2017.
All research outputs
#1,712,705
of 8,875,848 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pain Research
#151
of 582 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,489
of 303,455 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pain Research
#13
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,875,848 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 582 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 303,455 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.