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Impact of inpatient caseload, emergency department duties, and online learning resource on General Medicine In-Training Examination scores in Japan

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of General Medicine, October 2015
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1 tweeter

Citations

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11 Mendeley
Title
Impact of inpatient caseload, emergency department duties, and online learning resource on General Medicine In-Training Examination scores in Japan
Published in
International Journal of General Medicine, October 2015
DOI 10.2147/ijgm.s81920
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kensuke Kinoshita, Yusuke Tsugawa, Taro Shimizu, Yusuke Tanoue, Ryota Konishi, Yuji Nishizaki, Toshiaki Shiojiri, Yasuharu Tokuda

Abstract

Both clinical workload and access to learning resource are important components of educational environment and may have effects on clinical knowledge of residents. We conducted a survey with a clinical knowledge evaluation involving postgraduate year (PGY)-1 and -2 resident physicians at teaching hospitals offering 2-year postgraduate training programs required for residents in Japan, using the General Medicine In-Training Examination (GM-ITE). An individual-level analysis was conducted to examine the impact of the number of assigned patients and emergency department (ED) duty on the residents' GM-ITE scores by fitting a multivariable generalized estimating equations. In hospital-level analysis, we evaluated the relationship between for the number of UpToDate reviews for each hospital and for the hospitals' mean GM-ITE score. A total of 431 PGY-1 and 618 PGY-2 residents participated. Residents with four or five times per month of the ED duties exhibited the highest mean scores compared to those with greater or fewer ED duties. Those with largest number of inpatients in charge exhibited the highest mean scores compared to the residents with fewer inpatients in charge. Hospitals with the greater UpToDate topic viewing showed significantly greater mean score. Appropriate ED workload and inpatient caseload, as well as use of evidence-based electronic resources, were associated with greater clinical knowledge of residents.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 9%
Unknown 10 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 18%
Researcher 2 18%
Student > Postgraduate 2 18%
Student > Master 1 9%
Professor 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Unknown 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 45%
Social Sciences 2 18%
Unknown 4 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 August 2018.
All research outputs
#11,855,314
of 13,366,039 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of General Medicine
#346
of 428 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#285,051
of 345,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of General Medicine
#10
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,366,039 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 428 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,318 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.