↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Associations among depressive symptoms, childhood abuse, neuroticism, and adult stressful life events in the general adult population

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
Title
Associations among depressive symptoms, childhood abuse, neuroticism, and adult stressful life events in the general adult population
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s128557
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kotaro Ono, Yoshikazu Takaesu, Yukiei Nakai, Akiyoshi Shimura, Yasuyuki Ono, Akiko Murakoshi, Yasunori Matsumoto, Hajime Tanabe, Ichiro Kusumi, Takeshi Inoue

Abstract

Recent studies have suggested that the interactions among several factors affect the onset, progression, and prognosis of major depressive disorder. This study investigated how childhood abuse, neuroticism, and adult stressful life events interact with one another and affect depressive symptoms in the general adult population. A total of 413 participants from the nonclinical general adult population completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale, the neuroticism subscale of the shortened Eysenck Personality Questionnaire - Revised, and the Life Experiences Survey, which are self-report scales. Structural equation modeling (Mplus version 7.3) and single and multiple regressions were used to analyze the data. Childhood abuse, neuroticism, and negative evaluation of life events increased the severity of the depressive symptoms directly. Childhood abuse also indirectly increased the negative appraisal of life events and the severity of the depressive symptoms through enhanced neuroticism in the structural equation modeling. There was recall bias in this study. The causal relationship was not clear because this study was conducted using a cross-sectional design. This study suggested that neuroticism is the mediating factor for the two effects of childhood abuse on adulthood depressive symptoms and negative evaluation of life events. Childhood abuse directly and indirectly predicted the severity of depressive symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 10%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Lecturer 3 6%
Other 13 27%
Unknown 13 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 18%
Unspecified 5 10%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Mathematics 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 17 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2017.
All research outputs
#11,040,075
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,686
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#179,332
of 260,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#57
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,585 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.