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Blood pressure and anthropometry in children treated with stimulants: a longitudinal cohort study with an individual approach

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2017
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Title
Blood pressure and anthropometry in children treated with stimulants: a longitudinal cohort study with an individual approach
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s123526
Pubmed ID
Authors

Magnus Landgren, Salmir Nasic, Mats Johnson, Trygve Lovoll, Daniel Holmgren, Elisabeth Fernell

Abstract

Knowledge about the long-term effects on blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI) when treating young patients for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) with stimulants is limited. Most of the studies have reported mean and not individual values for anthropometrics and BP in treatment with stimulants. This seems to be the first study of changes based on the analyses of individual data measured over time. Seventy young patients (aged 8-18 years) diagnosed with AD/HD and responding well to treatment with stimulants were followed for a mean period of 3 years and 3 months. BP, heart rate, height, weight, and BMI were transformed to standard deviations or z-scores from before treatment to the last registered visit. The mean dose of methylphenidate was 0.95 mg/kg. The mean increase of systolic and diastolic BP was 0.4 z-score and 0.1 z-score, respectively. The systolic BP was associated with BMI; a higher BMI at baseline increased the risk for an increase in systolic BP. Ten percent of the total group had a weight at follow-up of <-1.5 standard deviation (SD) and 12% had a height of <-1.5 SD. Mean height at follow-up was -0.2 SD, but 40% had a reduced height of at least 0.5 SD during the treatment period. BMI on a group level was reduced from +0.8 SD to +0.3 SD. Of the 19 patients with a BMI >+1.5 SD at baseline, 50% had a significantly reduced BMI. Consequences of stimulant treatment must be evaluated individually. Besides significant effects on core AD/HD symptoms, some patients have lower BMI and BP and some increase/maintain their BMI and/or increase their systolic BP. The risk of reduced height trajectory needs further research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 19%
Student > Master 2 13%
Librarian 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Professor 2 13%
Other 4 25%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2017.
All research outputs
#11,040,077
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,686
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,778
of 258,784 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#58
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.