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Bipolar disorder recurrence prevention using self-monitoring daily mood charts: case reports from a 5 year period

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, March 2017
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
Title
Bipolar disorder recurrence prevention using self-monitoring daily mood charts: case reports from a 5 year period
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, March 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s132355
Pubmed ID
Authors

Norio Yasui-Furukori, Kazuhiko Nakamura

Abstract

Mood symptoms in bipolar disorders are significantly related to psychosocial events, and the personalized identification of symptom triggers is important. Ecological momentary assessments have been used in paper-and-pencil form to explore emotional reactivity to daily life stress in patients with bipolar disorder. However, there are few data on long-term recurrence prevention effects using ecological momentary assessments. Subjects were three outpatients with bipolar disorder who had a history of at least one admission. They recorded self-monitoring daily mood charts using a 5-point Likert scale. Paper-and-pencil mood charts included mood, motivation, thinking speed, and impulsivity. Additionally, they recorded waking time, bedtime, and medication compliance. Fewer manic or depressive episodes including admissions occurred after self-monitoring daily mood charts compared to patients' admissions in the past 3 years. This study suggests that self-monitoring daily mood in addition to mood stabilizing medication has some effect on recurrence prevention in follow-up periods of at least 5 years. Further studies with rigorous designs and large sample sizes are needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 18%
Researcher 4 14%
Student > Master 4 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 7 25%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 11 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 25%
Neuroscience 2 7%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 4 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2017.
All research outputs
#8,506,953
of 14,687,926 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,144
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,479
of 258,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#43
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,687,926 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,359 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.