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Dove Medical Press

Role of biomarkers in understanding and treating children with asthma: towards personalized care

Overview of attention for article published in Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine, August 2013
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53 Mendeley
Title
Role of biomarkers in understanding and treating children with asthma: towards personalized care
Published in
Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine, August 2013
DOI 10.2147/pgpm.s30626
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jason E Lang, Kathryn V Blake

Abstract

Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases affecting children. Despite publicized expert panels on asthma management and the availability of high-potency inhaled corticosteroids, asthma continues to pose an enormous burden on quality of life for children. Research into the genetic and molecular origins of asthma are starting to show how distinct disease entities exist within the syndrome of "asthma". Biomarkers can be used to diagnose underlying molecular mechanisms that can predict the natural course of disease or likely response to drug treatment. The progress of personalized medicine in the care of children with asthma is still in its infancy. We are not yet able to apply stratified asthma treatments based on molecular phenotypes, although that time may be fast approaching. This review discusses some of the recent advances in asthma genetics and the use of current biomarkers that can help guide improved treatment. For example, the fraction of expired nitric oxide and serum Immunoglobulin E (IgE) (including allergen-specific IgE), when evaluated in the context of recurrent asthma symptoms, are general predictors of allergic airway inflammation. Biomarker assays for secondhand tobacco smoke exposure and cysteinyl leukotrienes are both promising areas of study that can help personalize management, not just for pharmacologic management, but also education and prevention efforts.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
India 1 2%
Unknown 50 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 21%
Student > Master 10 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 3 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Psychology 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 7 13%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2013.
All research outputs
#16,305,401
of 25,748,735 outputs
Outputs from Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,738
of 210,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,748,735 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.5. This one scored the same or higher as 0 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,995 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them