↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Ultraviolet damage to the eye revisited: eye-sun protection factor (E-SPF®), a new ultraviolet protection label for eyewear

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Ophthalmology, December 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 2,725)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
23 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
7 tweeters
patent
6 patents

Citations

dimensions_citation
66 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
144 Mendeley
Title
Ultraviolet damage to the eye revisited: eye-sun protection factor (E-SPF®), a new ultraviolet protection label for eyewear
Published in
Clinical Ophthalmology, December 2013
DOI 10.2147/opth.s46189
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francine Behar-Cohen, Baillet, De Ayguavives, Jean Krutmann, Pena Garcia, Charlotte Reme, Wolffsohn, Paula Ortega García

Abstract

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation potentially damages the skin, the immune system, and structures of the eye. A useful UV sun protection for the skin has been established. Since a remarkable body of evidence shows an association between UV radiation and damage to structures of the eye, eye protection is important, but a reliable and practical tool to assess and compare the UV-protective properties of lenses has been lacking. Among the general lay public, misconceptions on eye-sun protection have been identified. For example, sun protection is mainly ascribed to sunglasses, but less so to clear lenses. Skin malignancies in the periorbital region are frequent, but usual topical skin protection does not include the lids. Recent research utilized exact dosimetry and demonstrated relevant differences in UV burden to the eye and skin at a given ambient irradiation. Chronic UV effects on the cornea and lens are cumulative, so effective UV protection of the eyes is important for all age groups and should be used systematically. Protection of children's eyes is especially important, because UV transmittance is higher at a very young age, allowing higher levels of UV radiation to reach the crystalline lens and even the retina. Sunglasses as well as clear lenses (plano and prescription) effectively reduce transmittance of UV radiation. However, an important share of the UV burden to the eye is explained by back reflection of radiation from lenses to the eye. UV radiation incident from an angle of 135°-150° behind a lens wearer is reflected from the back side of lenses. The usual antireflective coatings considerably increase reflection of UV radiation. To provide reliable labeling of the protective potential of lenses, an eye-sun protection factor (E-SPF®) has been developed. It integrates UV transmission as well as UV reflectance of lenses. The E-SPF® compares well with established skin-sun protection factors and provides clear messages to eye health care providers and to lay consumers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 144 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 144 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 18 13%
Student > Bachelor 17 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 11%
Researcher 16 11%
Student > Master 15 10%
Other 31 22%
Unknown 31 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 24%
Engineering 11 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 6%
Chemistry 8 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 6%
Other 35 24%
Unknown 38 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 223. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 May 2021.
All research outputs
#99,445
of 18,694,771 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Ophthalmology
#4
of 2,725 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,142
of 282,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Ophthalmology
#1
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,694,771 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,725 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,868 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.