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Efficacy of WBV as a modality for inducing changes in body composition, aerobic fitness, and muscular strength: a pilot study.

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
117 Mendeley
Title
Efficacy of WBV as a modality for inducing changes in body composition, aerobic fitness, and muscular strength: a pilot study.
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, December 2013
DOI 10.2147/cia.s30048
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph Signorile, Tapp

Abstract

The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of whole body vibration (WBV) training as a modality for inducing changes in body composition, cardiovascular condition, and muscular strength in sedentary postmenopausal women. WBV training was compared with other training regimens, ie, aerobic training and circuit resistance training, commonly used to promote weight loss, cardiovascular conditioning, and muscular strength. Postmenopausal women (aged 48-60 years) were randomly assigned to WBV training, circuit resistance training, or aerobic training. Participants trained three times per week for 8 weeks. The training regimens were progressive in nature, with increases in training intensity and duration occurring throughout the 8-week period. Body composition was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analyses. A modified Bruce treadmill protocol was used to assess aerobic capacity (VO2peak) and time to peak exhaustion. Upper and lower body strengths were determined by one repetition maximum (1-RM) chest and leg presses, respectively. Variables were analyzed using separate 3 (exercise mode) × 2 (time) repeated-measures analysis of variance with effect sizes due to the small sample size. No significant main effects or interactions were seen for any body composition variable; however, moderate to large effect sizes (η (2)=0.243 and η (2)=0.257) were detected regarding interactions for percent body fat and lean body mass favoring aerobic training and circuit resistance training. For VO2peak, no significant main effects or interactions were detected (time, η (2)=0.150; P=0.11; time × group, η (2)=0.139; P=0.30); but a significant time effect was observed for time to peak exhaustion (η (2)=0.307; P=0.017). A significant interaction for upper body strength (η (2)=0.464; P=0.007), and main effect for time in lower body strength (η (2)=0.663; P=0.0001) was detected. Post hoc analysis indicated a significant increase in upper body strength for circuit resistance training (P=0.023) and a decrease for WBV training (P=0.015). Our results indicate that WBV may not be an effective alternative to traditional training with regard to body composition or aerobic capacity, but could have a positive impact on lower body strength.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 114 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 15%
Student > Bachelor 15 13%
Researcher 9 8%
Professor 7 6%
Other 23 20%
Unknown 16 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 41 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 9%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 25 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,369,774
of 5,163,199 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#337
of 752 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,114
of 134,760 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#33
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,163,199 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 752 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 134,760 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.