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Blood pressure reactivity to mental stress is attenuated following resistance exercise in older hypertensive women

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, May 2017
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58 Mendeley
Title
Blood pressure reactivity to mental stress is attenuated following resistance exercise in older hypertensive women
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, May 2017
DOI 10.2147/cia.s130787
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rafael Gauche, Ricardo Moreno Lima, Jonathan Myers, André B Gadelha, Silvia GR Neri, Claudia LM Forjaz, Lauro C Vianna

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the effects of resistance exercise (RE) on autonomic control and blood pressure (BP) reactivity during mental stress (MS) in treated older hypertensive women. Ten older hypertensive women (age =71.1±5.5 years; body mass index =24.2±3.9; mean BP [MBP] =85.4±3.5) underwent a protocol consisting of BP and heart rate variability (HRV) output assessments at baseline and during MS, and these measurements were taken before and 60 minutes after two bouts of RE (traditional and circuit). MS was induced through a computerized 3-minute Stroop color-word test before and 1 hour after each exercise session; BP was measured every minute during MS, and HRV was monitored as a measure of cardiac autonomic control. A significant effect of time on systolic BP (Δpre =17.4±12.8 versus Δpost =12.5±9.6; P=0.01), diastolic BP (Δpre =13.7±7.1 versus Δpost =8.8±4.5; P=0.01), and MBP (Δpre =14.0±7.7 versus Δpost =9.3±5.4; P<0.01) after RE was observed, with no differences between the two sessions. In addition, a significant effect of time on log-normalized low-frequency component of HRV (ms2; 5.3±0.8 pre-exercise MS versus 4.8±1.0 baseline value; P=0.023) was also observed, showing a significant change from baseline to MS before RE, but not after RE sessions. These results may be related to a lessened RE-mediated cardiac sympathetic activity during MS. RE is an effective tool to reduce BP reactivity to MS, which could therefore be associated with an acute reduction in cardiovascular risk. This result presents relevant clinical implications, combining previous evidence that recommends this exercise modality as an important component of an exercise program designed for the older and hypertensive subjects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 24%
Student > Master 10 17%
Other 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Researcher 4 7%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 10 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 14%
Psychology 7 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 13 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2017.
All research outputs
#7,671,452
of 10,263,476 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#785
of 1,131 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,681
of 264,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#25
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,263,476 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,131 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,565 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.