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Investigating the use of curcumin-loaded electrospun filaments for soft tissue repair applications

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Nanomedicine, May 2017
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1 tweeter
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Citations

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51 Mendeley
Title
Investigating the use of curcumin-loaded electrospun filaments for soft tissue repair applications
Published in
International Journal of Nanomedicine, May 2017
DOI 10.2147/ijn.s133326
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pierre-Alexis Mouthuy, Maja Somogyi Škoc, Ana Čipak Gašparović, Lidija Milković, Andrew J Carr, Neven Žarković

Abstract

Electrospun filaments represent a new generation of medical textiles with promising applications in soft tissue repair. A potential strategy to improve their design is to combine them with bioactive molecules. Curcumin, a natural compound found in turmeric, is particularly attractive for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties. However, investigating the range of relevant doses of curcumin in materials designed for tissue regeneration has remained limited. In this paper, a wide range of curcumin concentrations was explored and the potential of the resulting materials for soft tissue repair applications was assessed. Polydioxanone (PDO) filaments were prepared with various amounts of curcumin: 0%, 0.001%, 0.01%, 0.1%, 1%, and 10% (weight to weight ratio). The results from the present study showed that, at low doses (≤0.1%), the addition of curcumin has no influence on the spinning process or on the physicochemical properties of the filaments, whereas higher doses lead to smaller fiber diameters and improved mechanical properties. Moreover, filaments with 0.001% and 0.01% curcumin stimulate the metabolic activity and proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) compared with the no-filament control. However, this stimulation is not significant when compared to the control filaments (0%). Highly dosed filaments induce either the inhibition of proliferation (with 1%) or cell apoptosis (with 10%) as a result of the concentrations of curcumin found in the medium (9 and 32 μM, respectively), which are near or above the known toxicity threshold of curcumin (~10 μM). Moreover, filaments with 10% curcumin increase the catalase activity and glutathione content in NHDFs, indicating an increased production of reactive oxygen species resulting from the large concentration of curcumin. Overall, this study suggested that PDO electrospun filaments loaded with low amounts of curcumin are more promising compared with higher concentrations for stimulating tissue repair. This study also highlighted the need to explore lower concentrations when using polymers as PDO, such as those with polycaprolactone and other degradable polyesters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 27%
Student > Master 9 18%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 8%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 7 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 16 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 May 2017.
All research outputs
#17,897,310
of 22,977,819 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#2,762
of 3,837 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,840
of 310,777 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#41
of 81 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,977,819 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,837 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,777 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 81 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.