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Pediatric ventricular assist devices: current challenges and future prospects

Overview of attention for article published in Vascular Health and Risk Management, May 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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88 Mendeley
Title
Pediatric ventricular assist devices: current challenges and future prospects
Published in
Vascular Health and Risk Management, May 2017
DOI 10.2147/vhrm.s82379
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Burki, Iki Adachi

Abstract

The field of mechanical circulatory support has made great strides in the preceding 2 decades. Although pediatric mechanical circulatory support has lagged behind that of adults, the gap between them is expected to close soon. The only device currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in children is the Berlin Heart EXCOR ventricular assist device (VAD). The prospective Berlin Heart Investigational Device Exemption Trial demonstrated good outcomes, such as bridge to transplantation or recovery, in ~90% of children supported with this device. However, a high incidence of hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications was also noted. As a result, pediatric centers have just started implanting adult intracorporeal continuous-flow devices in children. This paradigm shift has opened a new era in pediatric mechanical circulatory support. Whereas children on VAD were previously managed exclusively in hospital, therapeutic options such as outpatient management and even destination therapy have been becoming a reality. With continued miniaturization and technological refinements, devices currently in development will broaden the range of options available to children. The HeartMate 3 and HeartWare MVAD are two such compact VADs, which are anticipated to have great potential for pediatric use. Additionally, a pediatric-specific continuous-flow VAD, the newly redesigned Jarvik Infant 2015, is currently undergoing preclinical testing and is expected to undergo a randomized clinical trial in the near future. This review aims to discuss the challenges posed by the use of intracorporeal adult continuous-flow devices in children, as well as to provide our perspective on the future prospects of the field of pediatric VADs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 12 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Researcher 9 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 10%
Professor 6 7%
Other 21 24%
Unknown 21 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 39%
Engineering 12 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 29 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2017.
All research outputs
#10,427,458
of 11,761,635 outputs
Outputs from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#457
of 504 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#226,473
of 270,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,761,635 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 504 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,187 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.