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Historical development of vaginal microbicides to prevent sexual transmission of HIV in women: from past failures to future hopes

Overview of attention for article published in Drug Design, Development and Therapy, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
98 Mendeley
Title
Historical development of vaginal microbicides to prevent sexual transmission of HIV in women: from past failures to future hopes
Published in
Drug Design, Development and Therapy, June 2017
DOI 10.2147/dddt.s133170
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fernando Notario-Pérez, Roberto Ruiz-Caro, Maria-Dolores Veiga

Abstract

Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a global public health concern and is particularly serious in low- and middle-income countries. Widespread sexual violence and poverty, among other factors, increase the risk of infection in women, while currently available prevention methods are outside the control of most. This has driven the study of vaginal microbicides to prevent sexual transmission of HIV from men to women in recent decades. The first microbicides evaluated were formulated as gels for daily use and contained different substances such as surfactants, acidifiers and monoclonal antibodies, which failed to demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials. A gel containing the reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir showed protective efficacy in women. However, the lack of adherence by patients led to the search for dosage forms capable of releasing the active principle for longer periods, and hence to the emergence of the vaginal ring loaded with dapivirine, which requires a monthly application and is able to reduce the sexual transmission of HIV. The future of vaginal microbicides will feature the use of alternative dosage forms, nanosystems for drug release and probiotics, which have emerged as potential microbicides but are still in the early stages of development. Protecting women with vaginal microbicide formulations would, therefore, be a valuable tool for avoiding sexual transmission of HIV.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 98 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Researcher 10 10%
Other 9 9%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 29 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 17 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 6%
Chemistry 5 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 4%
Other 18 18%
Unknown 35 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,548,898
of 11,430,110 outputs
Outputs from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#367
of 1,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,536
of 264,784 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#13
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,430,110 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,201 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,784 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.