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Adapting the short form of the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations into Chinese

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2017
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32 Mendeley
Title
Adapting the short form of the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations into Chinese
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s136950
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chun Li, Qing Liu, Ti Hu, Xiaoyan Jin

Abstract

The Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) is a measurement tool for evaluating stress that has good psychometric properties. We investigated the applicability of a short-form version of the CISS in a large sample of Chinese university students. Nine hundred and seventy-two Chinese university students aged 18-30 years (mean =20.15, standard deviation =3.26) were chosen as subjects, of whom 101 were randomly selected to be retested after a 2-week interval. The results of a confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the root mean square error of approximation of a four-factor model was 0.06, while the comparative fit index was 0.91, the incremental fit index was 0.93, the non-normed fit index was 0.91, and the root mean residual was 0.07. The Cronbach's α coefficients for the task-oriented, emotion-oriented, distraction, and social diversion coping subscales were 0.81, 0.74, 0.7, and 0.66, respectively. The 2-week test-retest reliability was 0.78, 0.74, 0.7, and 0.65 for the task-oriented, emotion-oriented, distraction, and social diversion coping subscales, respectively. In the Chinese version of the CISS short form, task-oriented coping was positively correlated with positive affect and extraversion and negatively correlated with neuroticism; emotion-oriented coping was negatively correlated with extraversion and positively correlated with negative affect, anxiety, and neuroticism; distraction coping was positively correlated with neuroticism, extroversion, anxiety, positive affect, and negative affect and negatively correlated with psychoticism; and social diversion coping was positively correlated with extroversion and positive affect and negatively correlated with psychoticism. The Chinese version of the CISS short form is satisfactorily valid and reliable among Chinese university students.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 9 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Unknown 12 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2017.
All research outputs
#12,842,867
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#2,016
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#225,655
of 265,673 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#77
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,673 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.