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Factors associated with failure to achieve remission and with relapse after remission in patients with major depressive disorder in the PERFORM study

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2017
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94 Mendeley
Title
Factors associated with failure to achieve remission and with relapse after remission in patients with major depressive disorder in the PERFORM study
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s136343
Pubmed ID
Authors

Delphine Saragoussi, Maëlys Touya, Josep Maria Haro, Bengt Jönsson, Martin Knapp, Bastien Botrel, Ioana Florea, Henrik Loft, Benoît Rive

Abstract

The Prospective Epidemiological Research on Functioning Outcomes Related to Major Depressive Disorder (PERFORM) study has been initiated to better understand the course of a depressive episode and its impact on patient functioning. This analysis aimed to identify sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with failure to achieve remission at month 2 after initiating or switching antidepressant monotherapy and with subsequent relapse at month 6 for patients in remission at month 2. This was a 2-year observational cohort study in 1,159 outpatients aged 18-65 years with major depressive disorder initiating or undergoing the first switch of antidepressant monotherapy. Factors with P<0.20 in univariate logistic regression analyses were combined in a multiple logistic regression model to which backward variable selection was applied (ie, sequential removal of the least significant variable from the model and recomputation of the model until all remaining variables have P<0.05). Baseline factors significantly associated with lower odds of remission at month 2 were body-mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) (OR 0.51), depressive episode >8 weeks (OR 0.51), being in psychotherapy (OR 0.51), sexual dysfunction (OR 0.62), and severity of depression (OR 0.87). Factors significantly associated with relapse at month 6 were male sex (OR 2.47), being married or living as a couple (OR 2.73), residual patient-reported cognitive symptoms at 2 months (OR 1.12 per additional unit of Perceived Deficit Questionnaire-5 score) and residual depressive symptoms at 2 months (OR 1.27 per additional unit of Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score). Different factors appear to be associated with failure to achieve remission in patients with major depressive disorder and with subsequent relapse in patients who do achieve remission. Patient-reported cognitive dysfunction is an easily measurable and treatable characteristic that may be associated with an increased likelihood of relapse at 6 months in patients who have achieved remission.

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The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 94 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 16%
Researcher 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Master 8 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 7%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 27 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 24 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 17%
Neuroscience 4 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 3%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 32 34%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2017.
All research outputs
#16,725,651
of 25,382,440 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,719
of 3,131 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#198,361
of 327,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#42
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,382,440 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,131 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 327,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.