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Association between COMT Val158Met and DAT1 polymorphisms and depressive symptoms in the obese population

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2017
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Title
Association between <em>COMT</em> Val158Met and <em>DAT1</em> polymorphisms and depressive symptoms in the obese population
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s138565
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maciej Bieliński, Marcin Jaracz, Natalia Lesiewska, Marta Tomaszewska, Marcin Sikora, Roman Junik, Anna Kamińska, Andrzej Tretyn, Alina Borkowska

Abstract

Depressive symptoms are common among patients with obesity. Abnormalities in dopamine signaling involved in the reward circuit may ensue excessive consumption of food, resulting in obesity and leading to neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. This study sought to investigate the association of polymorphisms in the genes encoding DAT1/SLC6A3 and COMT with the intensity of depressive symptoms in obese subjects. Prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms were assessed in a group of 364 obese patients using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Genetic polymorphisms in DAT1 and COMT were evaluated in peripheral blood samples. The results indicated an association between DAT1 alleles and depressive symptoms, as well as severity of obesity. Subjects homozygous for the nine-repeat allele scored higher in BDI (P=0.022) and HDRS (P=0.00001), suggesting higher intensity of depression in both sexes. This allele was also associated with the highest body mass index (BMI; P=0.001). Carriers of the Val158Met allele of COMT scored higher on both depression scales (BDI, P=0.0005; HRDS, P=0.002) and had the highest BMI values. Polymorphisms in the DAT1 and COMT genes are associated with a greater intensity of depressive symptoms in the obese population.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 20%
Student > Master 3 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Lecturer 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 6 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 25%
Neuroscience 2 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 8 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2017.
All research outputs
#12,843,033
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#2,029
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#230,444
of 269,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#74
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,931 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.