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Improvements in motor tasks through the use of smartphone technology for individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
101 Mendeley
Title
Improvements in motor tasks through the use of smartphone technology for individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s125466
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camila Miliani Capelini, Talita Dias da Silva, James Tonks, Suzanna Watson, Mayra Priscila Boscolo Alvarez, Lilian Del Ciello de Menezes, Francis Meire Favero, Fátima Caromano, Thais Massetti, Carlos Bandeira de Mello Monteiro

Abstract

In individuals severely affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), virtual reality has recently been used as a tool to enhance community interaction. Smartphones offer the exciting potential to improve communication, access, and participation, and present the unique opportunity to directly deliver functionality to people with disabilities. To verify whether individuals with DMD improve their motor performance when undertaking a visual motor task using a smartphone game. Fifty individuals with DMD and 50 healthy, typically developing (TD) controls, aged 10-34 years participated in the study. The functional characterization of the sample was determined through Vignos, Egen Klassifikation, and the Motor Function Measure scales. To complete the task, individuals moved a virtual ball around a virtual maze and the time in seconds was measured after every attempt in order to analyze improvement of performance after the practice trials. Motor performance (time to finish each maze) was measured in phases of acquisition, short-term retention, and transfer. Use of the smartphone maze game promoted improvement in performance during acquisition in both groups, which remained in the retention phase. At the transfer phases, with alternative maze tasks, the performance in DMD group was similar to the performance of TD group, with the exception of the transfer to the contralateral hand (nondominant). However, the group with DMD demonstrated longer movement time at all stages of learning, compared with the TD group. The practice of a visual motor task delivered via smartphone game promoted an improvement in performance with similar patterns of learning in both groups. Performance can be influenced by task difficulty, and for people with DMD, motor deficits are responsible for the lower speed of execution. This study indicates that individuals with DMD showed improved performance in a short-term motor learning protocol using a smartphone. We advocate that this technology could be used to promote function in this population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 101 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 16%
Student > Master 14 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Researcher 7 7%
Other 13 13%
Unknown 30 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 23 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 15%
Neuroscience 9 9%
Psychology 9 9%
Environmental Science 1 <1%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 37 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 December 2020.
All research outputs
#5,853,730
of 19,822,123 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#798
of 2,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#94,659
of 285,754 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#18
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,822,123 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,796 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,754 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.