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Uncovering the influence of social skills and psychosociological factors on pain sensitivity using structural equation modeling

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pain Research, September 2017
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
Uncovering the influence of social skills and psychosociological factors on pain sensitivity using structural equation modeling
Published in
Journal of Pain Research, September 2017
DOI 10.2147/jpr.s143342
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoichi Tanaka, Yuki Nishi, Michihiro Osumi, Shu Morioka

Abstract

Pain is a subjective emotional experience that is influenced by psychosociological factors such as social skills, which are defined as problem-solving abilities in social interactions. This study aimed to reveal the relationships among pain, social skills, and other psychosociological factors by using structural equation modeling. A total of 101 healthy volunteers (41 men and 60 women; mean age: 36.6±12.7 years) participated in this study. To evoke participants' sense of inner pain, we showed them images of painful scenes on a PC screen and asked them to evaluate the pain intensity by using the visual analog scale (VAS). We examined the correlation between social skills and VAS, constructed a hypothetical model based on results from previous studies and the current correlational analysis results, and verified the model's fit using structural equation modeling. We found significant positive correlations between VAS and total social skills values, as well as between VAS and the "start of relationships" subscales. Structural equation modeling revealed that the values for "start of relationships" had a direct effect on VAS values (path coefficient =0.32, p<0.01). In addition, the "start of relationships" had both a direct and an indirect effect on psychological factors via social support. The results indicated that extroverted people are more sensitive to inner pain and tend to get more social support and maintain a better psychological condition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 53%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Other 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 53%
Psychology 4 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,731,297
of 11,753,826 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pain Research
#429
of 744 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,427
of 264,637 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pain Research
#27
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,753,826 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 744 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.2. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,637 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.