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Abdominal pain and nausea in the diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngitis in boys

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of General Medicine, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
Title
Abdominal pain and nausea in the diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngitis in boys
Published in
International Journal of General Medicine, September 2017
DOI 10.2147/ijgm.s144310
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hiroshi Igarashi, Naoki Nago, Hiromichi Kiyokawa, Motoharu Fukushi

Abstract

This study was designed to assess the accuracy of gastrointestinal symptoms, including abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, in the diagnosis of Group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis in children and to determine differences in diagnostic accuracy in boys versus girls. This retrospective cross-sectional study included 5,755 consecutive patients aged <15 years with fever in the electronic database at a primary care practice. Gastrointestinal symptoms were recorded in the database according to the International Classification of Primary Care codes, and the data were extracted electronically. The reference standard was GAS pharyngitis diagnosed with a rapid test. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of probable GAS pharyngitis were excluded from the primary analysis. Among the 5,755 children with fever, 331 (5.8%) were coded as having GAS pharyngitis, including 218 (65.9%) diagnosed with rapid tests and 113 (34.1%) clinically diagnosed with probable GAS pharyngitis. Among patients with fever and abdominal pain, rapid-test-confirmed GAS pharyngitis was significantly more common in boys (11/120, 9.2%) than in girls (3/128, 2.3%; p=0.026). The positive likelihood ratio of abdominal pain was 1.49 (95% CI =0.88-2.51): 2.41 (95% CI =1.33-4.36) in boys and 0.63 (95% CI =0.20-1.94) in girls. The positive likelihood ratio of nausea was 2.05 (95% CI =1.06-4.00): 2.74 (95% CI =1.28-5.86) in boys and 1.09 (95% CI =0.27-4.42) in girls. The association between abdominal pain and GAS pharyngitis was stronger in boys aged <6 years than in boys aged 6-15 years. Abdominal pain and nausea were associated with GAS pharyngitis in boys, but not in girls. Abdominal pain and nausea may help determine the suitability of rapid tests in younger boys with fever and other clinical findings consistent with GAS pharyngitis, even in the absence of sore throat.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 43%
Researcher 2 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 14%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 14%
Social Sciences 1 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 14%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2019.
All research outputs
#1,666,778
of 13,880,175 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of General Medicine
#65
of 441 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,878
of 273,153 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of General Medicine
#2
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,880,175 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 441 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,153 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.